Commercial Carbon Monoxide Law - Section 1228.4

Section 1228.4 Resources
Section 1228.4 Rule Text here
Webex Slide Presentation (PFD Format)
Click Here for a Commercial Carbon Monoxide Building Evaluation Worksheet

Notice of Emergency Rule Adoption
Transition Period for Existing Commercial Buildings

State CO Detector.jpgCOMPLIANCE DATE - JUNE 27, 2016

An amendment to the Executive Law of New York State modifying the Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code became effective on June 27, 2015, which now requires owners of existing commercial buildings to install carbon monoxide alarms or detection equipment in every commercial building and restaurant that: (i) contains any carbon monoxide source (including any garage or any other motor-vehicle-related occupancy); and/or (ii) is attached to a garage; and/or (iii) is attached to any other motor-vehicle-related occupancy.

The “transition period” provides that owners of existing commercial buildings are encouraged to install carbon monoxide detection as quickly as practicable; provides that the owner of an existing commercial building shall not be deemed to be in violation of section 1228.4 if the owner provides the authority having jurisdiction with a written statement certifying that such owner is attempting in good faith to install carbon monoxide detection that complies with the requirements of this section 1228.4 in such owner's existing commercial building as quickly as practicable; and provides that carbon monoxide detection that satisfies the requirements of section 1228.4 must be installed and must be fully operational in all existing commercial buildings by the end of the transition period.

What Are Sources of Carbon Monoxide?
potential-sources-CO.jpg
In general, CO is produced when any material burns. More is produced when there isn’t enough oxygen for efficient burning. Common sources of CO include fuel-burning devices such as: furnaces, gas or kerosene space heaters, boilers, gas cooking stoves, water heaters, clothes dryers, fireplaces, charcoal grills, wood stoves, lawn mowers, power generators, camp stoves, motor vehicles and some power tools with internal combustion engines. Smoking is another common source of CO that can negatively impact indoor air quality.
December 31.jpgThe term “existing commercial building” means a commercial building that was constructed prior to December 31, 2015.

For the purposes of this definition, a commercial building shall be deemed to have been constructed prior to December 31, 2015, and shall be deemed to be an existing commercial building, if:

(i) the original construction of such commercial building was completed prior to December 31, 2015 or

(ii) the complete application for the building permit for the original construction of such commercial building was filed prior to December 31, 2015

Estimated Cost for Installation NYS Codes.jpgCosts to regulated parties for compliance with this rule will vary depending on the size of such building, the number of carbon monoxide sources within the buildings, the wiring within the building, and the type of carbon monoxide detection (carbon monoxide alarms or a carbon monoxide detection system) the owner chooses to provide.

The New York State Division of Building Standards and Codes estimates that battery-powered carbon monoxide alarms cost approximately $50 (including installation costs).

The New York State Division of Building Standards and Codes estimates that the median price of multiple station CO alarms that are hard-wired and have battery backup will be approximately $38 per unit; the cost of installing such alarms will be approximately $90 per unit; and the cost of providing interconnection between the detection zone (classroom) to an on-site location up to 100 feet away will be approximately $250.

This rule provides that CO detection systems must be “monitored” (i.e., connected to control units and off-premises signal transmission). If a CO detection system is installed in a building that does not have a fire alarm system, New York State Division of Building Standards estimates that the cost of purchasing and installing the control unit required to provide “monitoring” of the CO detection system will be approximately $1,100.

When carbon monoxide alarms are installed in new commercial buildings, the alarms must be hard-wired units with battery backup. The New York State Division of Building Standards and Codes estimates that the total cost purchasing and installing hard-wired carbon monoxide alarms with battery backup will be approximately $125 per unit.

Lastly, this rule will permit installation of a carbon monoxide detection system in lieu of carbon monoxide alarms. The total cost of purchasing and installing one detector and one notification appliance (a necessary component of the carbon monoxide detection system) will be approximately $348. In addition, a carbon monoxide detection system requires a control unit.

Click Here October 7, 2015 NYS Register / Rule Making Activity (Scroll to Page 92)

How to Generate a Temporal 4 On Your Audio Visual Device
Now we have CO requirements for supervisory conditions that require a temporal 4 (T4) tone. However, many of the standard notification devices in the market don’t have a default temporal 4 tone setting, so what are you to do?

You may be happy to know that SpectrAlert Advance horns, 4-wire horn strobes, and low frequency sounders can support a wide variety of tones – outside of temporal 3 (T3) and continuous – that can be synchronized! Have you ever wondered about the coded audio setting on our devices?

Here’s a picture, just in case you haven’t seen it:
coded-setting-t4-system-sensor-sounder
The coded setting — which is located on the back of System Sensor’s SpectrAlert Advance horns, 4-wire horn strobes, and low frequency sounders — supports a variety of tones outside of T3 and continuous.

Fire alarm control systems that have approval for coded abilities can generate a wide variety of custom tones that our devices will accept, including temporal 4.

Consult with your system manufacturer for specific instructions, but in general this result is accomplished via panel programming. Many of the systems have a library of tones and T4 is a default setting. By setting the device to coded setting, it will follow the pattern sent from the fire alarm control system.

For example, let’s look at a new sleeping space that requires the low frequency tone for both smoke and CO. The fire alarm control panel can be programmed to generate a temporal 4 alarm tone when the carbon monoxide detector goes into an alarm state, sent as a supervisory signal to the system, and then switch to temporal 3 alarm tone when the smoke detector goes into alarm.

Now you have met two alarm condition requirements: smoke (T3) and CO (T4) – all while complying with the new low frequency requirements from one device. It’s really that easy.
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